Sublime and mighty name that embraces nothing charming or insinuating but requires submission, and yet does not seek to move the will by threatening anything that would arouse natural aversion or terror in the mind but only holds forth a law that of itself finds entry into the mind and yet gains reluctant reverence (though not always obedience), a law before which all inclinations are dumb, even though they secretly work against it; what origin is there worthy of you, and where is to be found the root of your noble descent which proudly rejects all kinship with the inclinations, descent from which is the indispensable condition of that worth which human beings alone can give themselves? That moral actions are not motivated by desire is the negative way of understanding our freedom when we act morally; that they are caused by the noumenal is the positive way of understanding that freedom. Theoretical reason, we learn in the first Critique, cannot inform us as to the existence of God, freedom, and immortality. Just because the notion of mystic union with God, for example, happens to appeal to me is no reason for me to think that it will happen. In that case, the demand is necessary for the faculty of reason as a whole and so commands … Error rating book. It is a wretched subterfuge to seek to evade this by saying that the kind of determining grounds of his causality in accordance with natural law agrees with a comparative concept of freedom … Sublime and mighty name that embraces nothing charming or insinuating but requires submission, and yet does not seek to move the will by threatening anything that would arouse natural aversion or terror in the mind but only holds forth a law that of itself finds entry into the mind and yet gains reluctant reverence (though not always obedience), a law before which all … Millions of books are just a click away on BN.com and through our FREE NOOK reading apps. Explore some of Immanuel Kant, Critique of Practical Reason best quotations and sayings on Quotes.net -- such as 'The inscrutable wisdom through which we exist is not less worthy of veneration in respect to what it denies us than in respect to what it has granted.' Welcome back. Although action from practical reason is always motivated solely by dutifulness, it also aims always at the highest good. Both start from self-evidence sources of wonder. SparkNotes is brought to you by Barnes & Noble. If this were right, we could make no sense of acting morally. I do not seek or conjecture either of them as if they were veiled obscurities or extravagances beyond the horizon of my vision; I see them before me and connect them immediately with the consciousness of my existence.”, “Two things fill the mind with ever-increasing wonder and awe, the more often and the more intensely the mind of thought is drawn to them: the starry heavens above and the moral law within.”. Kant does not discuss this explicitly in the Critique of Practical Reason, but it seems that he would also take theoretical reason to extend to areas which practical reason does not. The highest good is the rewarding of the virtuous with happiness, so it looks like we cannot assume that acting dutifully will produce the highest good. Use up and down arrows to review and enter to select. Moral action must spring solely from the motive of duty, not fear of punishment, hope of reward, or any other reason other than pure dutifulness. Only action from dutifulness is not in the end a means of pleasing oneself. ― Immanuel Kant, Critique of Practical Reason. Duty! Acting from duty is set apart completely from all other ways of acting, which are taken to spring from mere "inclination." Practical reason necessarily aims at the highest good, but for this to be, we must assume God to help bring it about and an eternity in which he can do it. [H]ow can that mean be called quite free at the same point of time and in regard to the same action in which and in regard to which he is nevertheless subject to an unavoidable nature necessity? The reason why we must believe in the postulates is the linkage of practical reason and the good. But when it is pure practical reason that makes demands, that is a different matter. This quote encapsulates Kant's view of moral motivation. Duty! Critique of Practical Reason. Critique of Practical Reason Quotes Showing 1-3 of 3. This is reflective of how acting from duty has a different origin metaphysically from other ways of acting: acting from duty is action caused from the noumenal realm. These postulates are not theoretical dogmas but presuppositions having a necessarily practical reference and thus, although they do not indeed extend speculative cognition, they give objective reality to the ideas of speculative reason in general (by means of their reference to what is practical) and justify its holding concepts even the possibility of which it could not otherwise presume to affirm. Practical reason simply demanding the object of its desire is not an acceptable reason to believe. However, if we assume that there is an afterlife and that God will reward or punish us there in accordance with our goodness or badness, then acting dutifully can aim at the highest good, and morality is possible. “Whereas the beautiful is limited, the sublime is limitless, so that the mind in the presence of the … (Freedom has a special role among the postulates of pure practical reason in that we can also non-sensorily detect it when we non- sensorily detect the moral law.) “Two things fill the mind with ever-increasing wonder and awe, the more often and the more intensely the mind of thought is drawn to them: the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me.”, “Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing admiration and awe, the more often and steadily we reflect upon them: the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me. Millions of books are just a click away on BN.com and through our FREE NOOK reading apps. SparkNotes is brought to you by Barnes & Noble. All Quotes “Two things fill the mind with ever-increasing wonder and awe, the more often and the more intensely the mind of thought is drawn to them: the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me.”. Critique of Practical Reason. The highest good is the rewarding of the virtuous with happiness, so it looks like we cannot assume that acting dutifully will produce the highest good. Although action from practical reason is always motivated solely by dutifulness, it also aims always at the highest good. Use up and down arrows to review and enter to select. However, following pure practical reason requires that we assume that these things are real. Kant compares the physical and the moral sciences. “Act in such a way that you treat humanity, whether in your own person or in the person of any other, … Refresh and try again. Quotes By Immanuel Kant. For example, practical reason will not have anything to say about … In Kant's view, non-moral motivation is always driven by self-love. So we have reason to believe in them. When I am not acting on duty, I am trying to bring about one of my desires, say, a desire to achieve a reward from God, or to avoid a punishment from him. Critique of Practical Reason Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing admiration and reverence, the more often and more steadily one reflects on them: the starry heavens above me and the moral law within me. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account.